Oct 15 Mon Dutch Golden Age of Rembrandt, Hals, and Vermeer at the Met

Johannes Vermeer (Dutch, Delft 1632–1675 Delft). Young Woman with a Water Pitcher, ca. 1662. Oil on canvas, 18 x 16 in. (45.7 x 40.6 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Marquand Collection, Gift of Henry G. Marquand, 1889

Johannes Vermeer (Dutch, Delft 1632–1675 Delft). Young Woman with a Water Pitcher, ca. 1662. Oil on canvas, 18 x 16 in. (45.7 x 40.6 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Marquand Collection, Gift of Henry G. Marquand, 1889

Dutch paintings of the 17th century—the Golden Age of Rembrandt, Hals, and Vermeer—have been a highlight of The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s collection since the Museum’s founding purchase in 1871. Opening October 16, the exhibition In Praise of Painting: Dutch Masterpieces at The Met will bring together some of the Museum’s greatest paintings to present this remarkable chapter of art history in a new light. Through roughly 65 works organized thematically, the exhibition will orient visitors to key issues in 17th-century Dutch culture—from debates about religion and conspicuous consumption to painters’ fascination with the domestic lives of women.

The exhibition will provide a fresh perspective on the canon and parameters of the Dutch Golden Age by uniting paintings from The Met’s Benjamin Altman, Robert Lehman, and Jack and Belle Linsky bequests. Works typically displayed separately in the Museum’s galleries—such as Rembrandt’s Gerard de Lairesse and Lairesse’s own Apollo and Aurora—will be presented side by side, producing a visually compelling narrative about the tensions between realism and idealism during this period.

The presentation will offer an opportunity to display recently conserved and rarely exhibited works, including Margareta Haverman’s A Vase of Flowers—one of only two known paintings by the artist and the only painting by an early modern Dutch woman in the Museum’s collection. The exceptional quality of Rembrandt’s late self-portrait will be even more evident following the removal of a synthetic varnish dating to the mid-20th century.

The title of the exhibition comes from one of the period’s major works of art theory, Philips Angel’s The Praise of Painting (1642), a pioneering defense of realism in art. Exhibition visitors will also be able to peruse a comprehensive two-volume catalogue by the late Walter Liedtke about The Met’s Dutch paintings collection.

In Praise of Painting: Dutch Masterpieces at The Met is organized by Adam Eaker, Assistant Curator in The Met’s Department of European Paintings.

The exhibition will be featured on The Met’s website, as well as on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter using the hashtag #MetDutchMasterpieces.

On view concurrently in The Robert Lehman Wing, Celebrating Tintoretto: Portrait Paintings and Studio Drawings will focus on the small-scale, informal portraiture of Venetian painter Jacopo Tintoretto in celebration of the 500th anniversary of his birth.

Jacopo Tintoretto (Jacopo Robusti) (Italian, 1518/19–1594). Portrait of a Man (Self Portrait?) (detail), 1550s? Oil on canvas, private collection.

Jacopo Tintoretto (Jacopo Robusti) (Italian, 1518/19–1594). Portrait of a Man (Self Portrait?) (detail), 1550s? Oil on canvas, private collection.

Jacopo Tintoretto (1518/19–1594) was one of the preeminent Venetian painters of the 16th century, and was renowned for his dynamic narrative scenes and insightful portraits. In celebration of the 500th anniversary of the artist’s birth, The Met will present Celebrating Tintoretto: Portrait Paintings and Studio Drawings, a focused exhibition that will explore an innovative aspect of his portraiture, and one that has been little studied: his small-scale, informal portrait heads characterized by their immediacy, intense observation, and startling modernity.

More
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Oct 12 Fri Watergate Doc by Charles Ferguson

Behind this facade, a Presidential fall   (Photo by Stefano Washington, America  - 1982)

Behind this facade, a Presidential fall
(Photo by Stefano Washington, America – 1982)

Four hours complete coverage of a major event in US political history which has much to say about the current situation in Washington and the world may sound like overkill except for students of history and newcomers to the topic but this blow by blow account of how a criminal President was prised from the Oval Office is a remarkable revelation of how American political events are deeply theatrical and often even comic even when momentous issues are at stake, a play of personalities as much as law and logic which can make four hours of attention twenty five years later pass as rapidly as any cliffhanger by Lee Child even though we know the final outcome.

PR =========================================
Friday, October 12th 4:45 PM
Cinema Village
22 East 12th Street, between Fifth and University
New York, NY 10003
Followed by a Q&A with filmmaker Charles Ferguson
Run time 4 hours and 20 minutes, plus a brief intermission

From filmmaker Charles Ferguson, WATERGATE tells for the first time, the entire story of the Watergate scandal, from the first troubling signs in Richard Nixon’s presidency to Nixon’s resignation and beyond; and features a roster of some of the most important media, legal and political figures from the scandal, including Carl Bernstein, Bob Woodward, John Dean, Jill Wine-Banks, Richard Ben-Veniste, and many others.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Oct 10 Wed 7-9pm Ralph Nader on Why It is Not Too Late to Turn the Country Around at Barnes and Noble East 86th Street

Ralph Nader gets a grip - a stronger grip on the failures of Bush, Obama and Hillary and the way to repair and make this nation great again than anyone in the world, and no one can match the power of his eloquence and truthtelling

Ralph Nader gets a grip – a stronger grip on the failures of Bush, Obama and Hillary and the way to repair and make this nation great again than anyone in the world, and no one can match the power of his eloquence and truthtelling

The Times saw fit especially to note the chance to hear the best progressive thinker, author, and public speechmaker in the country in a crowded out but relatively intimate setting at Barnes and Noble on East 86th St, and pick up his latest bunkerbuster of a book and get it signed personally, but his brilliant performance there on Wednesday only pointed up the foolishness of the publisher and the bookstore promotion worker bees for not placing him on a roomier stage at Union Square.

Naderlooks somewhat ravaged by the gloomy state of the nation but that doesn't prevent him from inspiring the audience with a road map to a progressive future and how easy it is in terms of core numbers to generate a voting tsunami which transforms the political landscape in the greatest issues

Nader looks somewhat ravaged by the gloomy state of the nation but that doesn’t prevent him from inspiring the audience with a road map to a progressive future and how easy it is in terms of core numbers to generate a tsunami which transforms the political landscape in the greatest issues

For in every respect Nader is such a dynamic speaker in style and content, so lively in delivering such a completely informed, critically unrestrained and nationally important message,that he deserves and could and should undoubtedly command a crowd as large as 50,000 at a time and persuade them of their urgent need to get off their butts and act, vote and participate in the reform of this nation’s broken political system, in a long list of policy respects he enumerated for us though without discouraging us with the enormity of the task.

As usual the distinguished political activist and office holder Mark Greene is in the front row of any appearance by his friend and fellow progressive  in New York City

As usual the distinguished political activist and office holder Mark Greene is in the front row of any appearance by his friend and fellow progressive in New York City

For as he emphasized at the beginning of his address history has shown that remarkably few people – 500 to 1000 – are needed to form the core of even the greatest political movements from anti-slavery to establishing the vote for women, and even one man’s efforts can be enough to effect major change, as for example a journalist present whom he saluted who had single handedly taken up the cause of the hapless population of East Timor and brought the world’s attention to their plight.

Announcement in the Times: The consumer advocate and presidential candidate Ralph Nader discusses his book “To the Ramparts: How Bush and Obama Paved the Way for the Trump Presidency, and Why It Isn’t Too Late to Reverse Course,” at Barnes & Noble on the Upper East Side. 7 p.m. [Free]

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Oct 2 Tue 7pm-9pm James Mustich Prodigious Author of 1000 Books To Read Before You Die at Barnes and Noble 86/Lex with David Denby

On Tuesday evening last week three men gathered on the stage of the subterranean public meeting room of Barnes and Noble on 86th St to mark the appearance of an extraordinary reference book, so comprehensive yet so readably written that it was notable in itself as a singular and remarkable achievement, the breathtaking accomplishment of a seemingly impossible task, namely, one man’s voluminous personal 948 page guide to his choice of the thousand finest books available, an encyclopaedia which the author James Musdich told us he had taken little more than a decade to produce, though it was true that he had had the advantage of being the cofounder and chief voice for two decades of the much mourned book catalogue The Common Reader, which must have given him much practice in the kind of performance required and supplied in his mini encyclopedia, namely, to keep to the point and to treat famous books familiar to millions as if they were freshly encountered, and precis their contents and describe their multifaceted virtues in terms requiring no overweight academic language but simply the spontaneous expression of the enthusiasm of a widely and deeply appreciative reader, all of which he had achieved without sacrificing honesty or slipping into pretension or posturing in his style which simply takes the hand of the reader who has never met the book he is describing and introduces him or her to the author and the work in the most friendly and conversational manner, while not losing an iota of accuracy or using any of the current verbal substitutes such as “amazing” or similar for articulate and penetrating praise which infest publishers blurbs and reviews dashed off by overworked and underpaid journalists who have not really had time to read the whole book they review, and who now showed no sign of the immodesty he is surely entitled to, as he sat with David Denby beside him, the New York and New Yorker film critic who had perhaps helped inspire him by producing his own well known 493 page Great Books guide of that title a quarter century ago, by joining in classes in that curriculum topic at Columbia at the age of forty eight, and then recounting his literary adventure from a similar independent and fresh but informed standpoint, and who now joined in from the stage before a crowded room with admiration for Musdich’s masterpiece, for which he had penned a back cover blurb celebrating it as a tutorial in reading with “judgment, taste, empathy, wit” which was , he noted,”surpassingly useful as well as good”, which is very true in that every review has appended to it suggestions for further reading of the author’s and related works, well selected color illustrations for each volume, and at the end a set of special lists grouping volumes by topic, and 1000 books list to check off as you read each one, though the likelihood of doing it before you die is remote, one has to say, though the entries are all so readable as well as erudite that one certainly will read them all, and afterwards we asked him the one key question which no one else had, what did Mustich think after making his enormous selection and writing it up so well made for “readability”, and he answered that “I think a book needs some kind of narrative energy for forward marching and for me some kind of stylistic form” and “does it need the ideas somehow personalized, yes I absolutely agree.”

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Oct 2 Tue Met – Art of Native America: The Charles and Valerie Diker Collection (Oct 4, 2018–Oct 6, 2019)

 Tsimshian artist. Headdress frontlet. British Columbia, ca. 1820–40. Wood, abalone shell, pigment, and metal. The Charles and Valerie Diker Collection of Native American Art, Promised Gift of Charles and Valerie Diker

Tsimshian artist. Headdress frontlet. British Columbia, ca. 1820–40. Wood, abalone shell, pigment, and metal. The Charles and Valerie Diker Collection of Native American Art, Promised Gift of Charles and Valerie Diker

Opening October 4 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Art of Native America: The Charles and Valerie Diker Collection will feature 116 masterworks representing the achievements of artists from more than 50 distinct indigenous traditions across North America. Ranging in date from the 2nd to the early 20th century, the diverse works are promised gifts (first announced in spring 2017), donations, and loans to The Met from the pioneering collectors Charles and Valerie Diker. The collection has particular strengths in sculpture from British Columbia and Alaska, California baskets, pottery from Southwestern pueblos, Plains drawings and regalia, and rare accessories from the eastern Woodlands.

The exhibition is made possible by The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation, the Diane W. and James E. Burke Fund, the Enterprise Holdings Endowment, and the Walton Family Foundation.

A ceremonial opening of the exhibition involving contemporary Native American artists, performers, and community leaders will be accompanied by a robust series of public programs.

Art of Native America will be the first exhibition of Native American art to be presented in the American Wing since it was established in 1924. Originally focused on American Colonial and early Federal decorative arts and architecture, the Wing’s collecting areas and focus have continued to evolve.

More
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Sep 25 Tue Tradition and Creation, Japan Calligraphy at the Nippon Gallery (September 25 – October 1, 2018)

A rare opportunity to look in on a purely Japanese cultural event watching along with an exclusively Japanese audience at an exhibition of calligraphy which featured many examples in wall hangings and, then, Shuho Kondo a distinguished artist producing calligraphy on the spot with black paintbrush and pot of ink in spontaneous creations reflecting the influence and themes of first, Mr. Yoshiki Miura and his first class Japanese jazz quartet playing sophisticated numbers from the Thelonius Monk era and then Chinese fiddle player Li Aki, a Japanese instrumentalist playing a traditional string instrument in the Japanese manner.

“Tradition and Creation”
Japanese Calligraphy Exhibition by Shuho Kondo and Japan Shuho Club members
With special participation by Social welfare corporation Hagukumu, Conceptual metal works Yuka Yoshida,
Jazz Guitarist Yoshiki Miura, Chinese fiddle player Li Aki

The Nippon Gallery is pleased to host “Tradition and Creation”, Japanese Calligraphy Exhibition by Shuho Kondo, who acts as a calligrapher energetically in Japan. In commemoration of the 50th anniversary of her teaching calligraphy, works by members of Shuho Japan Club will be exhibited.

Inheriting the tradition of Chinese Classics from her ancestors who were calligraphers from generation to generation, she has worked very hard to hand down the techniques to the younger generations.

Shuho has always been influenced by a phrase from Fushikaden, a treatise on Noh (traditional masked dance-drama) written by Zeami when she creates her works. “Learn from the old technique. Even when you attempt to create something new,” Zeami wrote. “Never disrespect what has been accomplished by the predecessors.”

At the exhibition, Shuho will exhibit her challenging works of art including a few pieces inspired by Fushikaden, The Ranteijo – the work of calligraphy written by Wang Xi-Zhi and the most famous in the calligraphy world -, and a large piece that says “Creation”.

Members of Shuho Calligraphy Club will exhibit their original pieces with the theme of “Tradition and Creation”.

At this exhibition, works by members of the social welfare corporation, Ito Okashi, where Shuho has been teaching calligraphy for 18 years, will be exhibited. “Iroha song”, masterpieces of “Manyoshu” and so on will be exhibited. Some of the works include winning works at international art projects.

Furthermore, Shuho is collaborating with Yuko Yoshida, a jewelry designer, which is a completely new experience for her as an artist. “I sincerely hope that the precious mind transmitted from our predecessors will be kept alive in each new expression,” Shuho says about the enthusiasm for this exhibition.

By all means, please enjoy many of the calligraphy works created with individual wonderful sensibilities, with the theme of “tradition and creation”.

■Opening Reception featuring a calligraphy performance in collaboration with Mr. Aki Lee, President of Chinese Fiddle Association in Japan. Also, with a great honor, Mr. Yoshiki Miura and his band will join them. Mr. Miura is a jazz guitarist who has composed music for Hollywood Movies and very popular TV programs in United States. This is the first time they collaborate together.

Date & Time: 9/25 (Tue) 18:00 pm – 20:00 pm (RSVP: yhonda@nipponclub.org)

Aki Lee, President of Chinese Fiddle Association in Japan
Yoshiki Miura, Jazz Guitarist
23 years veterans performing in the New York City area, with a funky, energetic jazz sound. His music crosses the traditional modern jazz boundaries, injecting R&B, and Latin styles. Graduated Berklee College of Music, Boston. His numerous performances include; “Grand Central’s Anniversary 2000”, “JVC Jazz Festival at Saratoga”, “Live at Blue Note in NY 2000″, “Texaco New York Jazz Festival ’98 & ’97”. His composition “KK” was used Episode #312 of the HBO Show ‘Sex and the City’. He was selected to recording session with EMI label under The Amalia Gre group on 2003 and 2005.Also music tour with Amalia Gre in Italy, March – August 2004include performance at Blue note in Milano, and opening act for Michael Blecker group at Trino Jazz Festival.
■Gallery Talk and Calligraphy performance: Shuho Kondo has always enjoyed making live calligraphy performance collaborating with musicians. This time, she has invited Mr. Aki Lee, President of Chinese Fiddle Association in Japan. While listening to the Chinese fiddle, She will improvise and create a classical, Chinese poem.
Date: Saturday, 9/29 1:30 pm – 3:00 pm (RSVP: info@nipponclub.org)

Admission Free

Yasuko Honda
Tue, Sep 18, 5:37 PM (7 hours ago)
September 25 – October 1, 2018
Mon-Fri: 10:00 am – 6:00 pm, Sat: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm, Sun: Closed

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Sep 25 Tue Tradition and Creation, Japan Calligraphy at the Nippon Gallery (September 25 – October 1, 2018)

Sept 12, Wed 10 am–noon Delacroix at the Met Tisch Galleries, Gallery 899, 2nd Floor (Sept 17, 2018–January 6, 2019)

Eugène Delacroix (French, 1798-1863). Self-Portrait with Green Vest, ca. 1837. Oil on canvas, 25 9/16 x 21 7/16 in. (65 x 54.5 cm). Musée du Louvre, Paris. © RMN-Grand Palais (Musée du Louvre) / Michel Urtado

News Release

Delacroix to Open September 17

Exhibition Dates: September 17, 2018–January 6, 2019
Exhibition Location:
The Met Fifth Avenue, The Tisch Galleries, Gallery 899, 2nd Floor
Press Preview: Wednesday, September 12, 10 am–noon
French painter Eugène Delacroix (1798–1863) was one of the greatest creative figures of the 19th century. Through his choice of daring subjects and compositions, a vibrant palette, and bold brushwork, he set into motion a cascade of innovations that changed the course of art. As Van Gogh wrote in 1885: “What I find so fine about Delacroix is precisely that he reveals the liveliness of things, and the expression and the movement, that he is utterly beyond the paint.” Although Delacroix is celebrated as the embodiment of the Romantic era, much remains to be understood about his life and prolific career. Delacroix, which opens on September 17 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, will be the first comprehensive retrospective in North America devoted to the artist. Visitors will discover a protean genius who continues to set the bar for artists today.

The monumental exhibition will illuminate Delacroix’s restless imagination in all its complexity through approximately 145 paintings, drawings, and prints—many of which have never been shown before in the United States. In addition to works from The Met collection, the exhibition will include exceptional loans from the Musée du Louvre and more than 60 museums and private collections throughout Europe and North America.

Delacroix is made possible by the Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw Charitable Trust.

Additional support is provided by the Janice H. Levin Fund, the Sherman Fairchild Foundation, The Florence Gould Foundation, and the Gail and Parker Gilbert Fund.

It is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Musée du Louvre.

Exhibition Overview

The exhibition will feature the three main phases of Delacroix’s career, which spanned more than four decades. The first section will be devoted to his formative years during the 1820s, when his ambitious paintings exhibited at the annual Paris Salons won him public recognition. The second section will focus on his exploration of historical themes, often on a grand scale, informed by public commissions from the 1830s onward. The third section will present an overview of the artist’s final years, marked by his triumph at the Universal Exposition of 1855 and his growing interest in nature.

The presentation will enable visitors to explore the diversity of themes that preoccupied Delacroix throughout his life. For example, he engaged with the art of the past; had a lifelong fascination with literary, historical, and biblical themes; and made transformative contributions to printmaking and book illustration. The exhibition will spotlight Delacroix’s interest in the world beyond Europe, including his own epochal voyage to North Africa in 1832. The variety of works will reveal Delacroix’s creative process and his progressive mastery of materials, including oil paint, watercolor, and graphic media.

Among the highlights will be Delacroix’s landmark works Greece on the Ruins of Missolonghi (1826), The Battle of Nancy (1831), and Women of Algiers in Their Apartment (1834). Visitors will have the first opportunity in a generation to examine closely Christ in the Garden of Olives (1824–27), removed from its perch high on the wall of the Parisian church of Saint-Paul-Saint-Louis and cleaned especially for the exhibition. Delacroix’s genius as a lithographer will be demonstrated in the 1828 French edition of Goethe’s Faust. The book will be paired with never-before-exhibited proof impressions for its illustrations, along with preparatory drawings for individual plates. The Met’s Department of Paintings Conservation has completed a yearlong treatment of the seminal still life Basket of Flowers (1848–49), removing a scrim-like layer of old varnish to reveal Delacroix’s full coloristic brilliance. Saint Sebastian Tended by the Holy Women (1836) and Medea about to Kill Her Children (1838) will convey the grandeur and gravitas of the artist’s maturity, while his anthropomorphic approach to animal subjects will be on full display in Young Tiger Playing with Its Mother (1830) and The Lion Hunt (1855).

Exhibition visitors will come away with a broadened appreciation for Delacroix’s remarkable oeuvre and its enduring appeal.

Credits, Catalogue, and Programs

Delacroix is organized by Asher Miller, Assistant Curator in the Department of European Paintings at The Met, in collaboration with Sébastien Allard, Director of the Department of Paintings at the Musée du Louvre, and Côme Fabre, Curator in the Department of Paintings at the Musée du Louvre.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a richly illustrated catalogue offering a fresh take on Delacroix’s complex character. The catalogue, published by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and distributed by Yale University Press, will be available in The Met Store.

The catalogue is made possible by the Diane W. and James E. Burke Fund and the Janice H. Levin Fund.

Several educational and public programs will be presented in conjunction with the exhibition. MetLiveArts performances will include Delacroix and Music, featuring pianist Brian Seger and mezzo-soprano Samantha Hankey (November 5 at 7 p.m.), and Sight and Sound: Chopin, Delacroix, and the Romantic Impulse (November 18 at 2 p.m.).

Delacroix and Music is made possible by The Isaacson-Draper Foundation.

Delacroix will be featured on The Met’s website, as well as on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

The Musée du Louvre is currently presenting Delacroix (1798–1863) through July 23, 2018.

Related Exhibition

Devotion to Drawing: The Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix—on view at The Met July 17 through November 12, 2018—will expand upon a major aspect of the artist’s production: his endlessly inventive work as a draftsman. The exhibition celebrates a collector’s generous gift to the Museum of some 130 drawings by Delacroix by the collector Karen B. Cohen. It is organized by Ashley Dunn, Assistant Curator in The Met’s Department of Drawings and Prints. The exhibition is made possible by The Schiff Foundation. The catalogue is made possible in part by The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation.

# # #

June 14, 2018

Image: Eugène Delacroix (French, 1798-1863). Self-Portrait with Green Vest, ca. 1837. Oil on canvas, 25 9/16 x 21 7/16 in. (65 x 54.5 cm). Musée du Louvre, Paris. © RMN-Grand Palais (Musée du Louvre) / Michel Urtado

For Immediate Release

Contact: Jennifer Isakowitz, Ann Bailis
communications@metmuseum.org; T 212 570 3951

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Sept 12, Wed 10 am–noon Delacroix at the Met Tisch Galleries, Gallery 899, 2nd Floor (Sept 17, 2018–January 6, 2019)

Aug 20 Mon-24 Fri US Open Qualifying Round Fan Week

What you missed last week – top tennis for subway fare

Focused intensity: Kamil Majchrzak lost, but the match was too close to put him off coming back next year to win

Focused intensity: Kamil Majchrzak lost, but the match was too close to put him off coming back next year to win

The height of the summer for those still on the island of Manhattan is a jaunt to Queens, where the US (Tennis) Open pulls in more money in two weeks than four rival stadia (Mets, Yankees, Knicks and Rangers) do in the entire year.

But cognoscenti know when to go – not to the shark priced main event to watch the overly familiar Serena Williams, Rafael Nadal, Nowak Djokovic and Roger Federer routinely retain ownership of the tennis peak but during the Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday of the fan week before the Open opens, when the desperate and often electric qualifying rounds between newcomers are held for the modest price of free entry, and watching those in action can be as close to the court as you like.

For the audience is usually light and empty seats alongside the server will place you as close as ten feet from his twisted pose after he throws up the ball. There is no better vantage point to watch top tennis, especially between advanced newcomers both desperate to clamber onto the final plateau of the US Open proper and do their country proud.

Defeat in two out of three sets will mean they have to put a brave face on a trip across half the world for nothing but disappointment and recorded failure, all for the lack of a point or two in a close match, and many of the qualifying rounds are that narrowly decided.

This year there was a special plum in the Qualifying Rounds pie with the ceremonial opening on Wed August 22nd of the newly rebuilt and refurbished Louis Armstrong stadium, which now houses 16,000 spectators beneath two tiers and a rain roof that can be slid closed if needed, and is frankly a much more horizontal and pleasing design than the main Arthur Ashe court, which also has a rain roof, where the championship finals are played before 24,000 people.

Take your seat as close as you like in the new Louis Armstrong in the totally upgraded US Open Center at Flushing Meadows

Take your seat as close as you like in the new Louis Armstrong in the totally upgraded US Open Center at Flushing Meadows

Of those 24,000 in Arthur Ashe half are up among the tennis Gods and unable to see much at all even through binoculars, and the other half sit close to play which the greedy top heavy design reduces to near total silence, but for the squeak of sneakers and the pitty pat of strokes meeting ball in a nightmare of muffled tennis which has nothing on the drama of TV sound and commentary.

The ceremony opening the new Armstrong again featured heroic local celebrity and tv match commentator John McEnroe,now 59, whose “You’ve gotta be kidding!” and other indignant remarks to umpires brought him attention well beyond his championship strokes in the early eighties which remain an unsurpassed total of wins in both singles and doubles around a peak in 1984.

McEnroe thanked David Dinkins, the one time mayor of New York City who was present, for his great service to tennis in the deal which expanded the center and kept it in the city, and for persuading La Guardia to close one runway during the matches, even though the continual overflight of planes landing nearby almost every minute still can interfere with hearing the play, or at least eavesdropping on the discussion between players and umpires if there is an objection to a ruling on behavior.

Planes pass overhead in a procession at intervals as short as two minutes or even less, sometimes more noisily that Mayor Dinkins tried to quiet

The dedication ceremony was also spiced by the playing of Wynton Marsalis, the renowned jazz and classical trumpeter, composer and director of Jazz at Lincoln Center who led a group of six or seven other musicians in New Orleans style marches up and down the court for ten minutes.

Poland in Play Twice

Many supporters of players from individual countries come to follow their fortunes in the qualifiers closely, and use the unmatched opportunity to meet them personally off the court once their bid is over, hopefully successfully, but to offer appreciation and encouragement to return next year even if not.

On the two perfectly fine yet cool days mid last week two promising Polish players acquitted themselves in exciting fashion in two tense and evenly matched court battles we witnessed, with one loss and one win for the home country.

Kamil Majchrzak contested a Spaniard with a much higher rating in the qualifying line up in mid afternoon on Court 5 only to lose a fairly even match 6-3, 6-3, in his first appearance here. Some spectators felt that the loud yelps his opponent gave out when hitting hard might have unfairly tipped the balance, but Majchrzak said he hadn’t cared one way or the other – “It is his style”.

He planned to go home and practice and play and come back next year for a better result, he said, demonstrating a mental objectivity in commenting on his setback which matched the steady coolness of his gaze which impressed one questioner as boding well for his future, contrary to the view of a Polish woman who projected onto him sympathetically that he appeared “stunned” after his loss.

In fact the next day we asked him at the courtside of a second match featuring his compatriot Hubert Hurkacz, a sixth seed in the qualifiers who won his match on court 13 against another Spaniard 6-3 6-3, what he and his coach had decided went wrong the day before, and he told us that “the first set went well, but then I began to make errors and lost my focus in the second”, without any impression that he thought his opponent superior in skill or tactics.

Is that ball coming or leaving?  Sit as close as you like to watch fresh winners like  Poland's Hubert Hurkacz break through to the main event (he won in the first round Monday)

Is that ball coming or leaving? Sit as close as you like to watch fresh winners like Poland’s Hubert Hurkacz break through to the main event (he won in the first round Monday)

The Pole who won, Hubert Hurkacz, beat Pedro Martinez with the same score reversed in what seemed an equally tense exchange in most points but the match was disrupted by booing early in the second set from a Polish man who felt that Pedro’s triumphant “take that” victory cries were aimed too pointedly at his opponent, and indeed the Spaniard got a warning from the umpire a couple of games later for that infraction.

So the stories might have been influenced by emotions but neither Polish player seemed bothered by such considerations and clearly both felt that concentration and focus were the key to success, and that at the level they had played the results were balanced on the knife edge that seems to be the case throughout tennis at the top level. We felt that their tough mindedness boded well for the careers of both players, and wait with interest to see their future careers unfold.

Polish advantage?  When the two top entrants conference courtside after Hurkacz's win, the camera reveals that Hubert also has eyes which suggest the intense focus needed to win knife edge sets at the highest level

Polish advantage? When the two top entrants conference courtside after Hurkacz’s win, the camera reveals that Hubert also has eyes which suggest the intense focus needed to win knife edge sets at the highest level

After seeing the second Polish match to its conclusion and talking to both players we wandered the newly spic and span Center whose Armstrong opening capped a $600 million renovation and ended the day with a view of Nadal practicing there from 4 oclock to 4.40 pm when we left, the excitement over his appearance having died down among the females of all ages in the audience who captured his strokes on their cell phones and applauded his every happy stroke.

Even when practicing a scowling Rafael Nadal seems to treat a ball (bottom right) as a hostile trespasser on his peace of mind that deserves summary justice

Even when practicing a scowling Rafael Nadal seems to treat a ball (bottom right) as a hostile trespasser on his peace of mind that deserves summary justice

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Aug 20 Mon-24 Fri US Open Qualifying Round Fan Week

Jul 24 Tue Century Foundation – Panel on Immigration Support in American Policy (Natalia Aristizabal-Betancur, Paige Austin, Tom Ikeda)

From the incarceration of Japanese-Americans during WWII to Trump-era initiatives like the Muslim Ban and family separation, American policy has too often framed immigrants, people of color, and religious minorities as a threat. What can we do to cut through this cycle of fear and support change that honors the history of this country and the diverse people that built it?

Join us on Tuesday, July 24 at 6:00 p.m. for a thought-provoking discussion and hear the stories of those of us affected by these policies, how those stories illuminate the issue, and how to move forward.

Featuring:

Natalia Aristizabal-Betancur, Co-Director of Organizing, Make the Road
Paige Austin, Staff Attorney, New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU)
Tom Ikeda, Executive Director, Densho
About Think. Drink. Mingle.
Every summer, The Century Foundation hosts a series of events bringing together civically engaged professionals working in NYC to expand their networks and discuss policies that promise to build a better future—all while enjoying a spread of wine and cheese. Whether you’re new to the city, here for the summer, or just really enjoy meeting other incredibly smart people, you’re invited to join us as we share a drink (or two) and discuss issues that matter.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Jul 24 Tue Century Foundation – Panel on Immigration Support in American Policy (Natalia Aristizabal-Betancur, Paige Austin, Tom Ikeda)

July 16 Mon Met – Devotion to Drawing: The Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix at The Met (Jul 1-Nov 12)

 Eugène Delacroix (French, 1798–1863). The Giaour on Horseback, 1824–26. Pen and iron gall ink with wash over graphite. 7 15/16 x 12 in. (20.1 x 30.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift from the Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix, in honor of Jane Roberts, 2015

Eugène Delacroix (French, 1798–1863). The Giaour on Horseback, 1824–26. Pen and iron gall ink with wash over graphite. 7 15/16 x 12 in. (20.1 x 30.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift from the Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix, in honor of Jane Roberts, 2015

Devotion to Drawing: The Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix—on view at The Met July 17 through November 12, 2018—will expand upon a major aspect of the artist’s production: his endlessly inventive work as a draftsman. The exhibition celebrates a collector’s generous gift to the Museum of some 130 drawings by Delacroix by the collector Karen B. Cohen. It is organized by Ashley Dunn, Assistant Curator in The Met’s Department of Drawings and Prints. The exhibition is made possible by The Schiff Foundation. The catalogue is made possible in part by The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation.

Renowned as a giant of French Romantic painting, Eugène Delacroix (1798–1863) was equally a dedicated and innovative draftsman. Opening on July 17, this exhibition will explore the central role of drawing in the artist’s practice through more than one hundred works—from finished watercolors and sketchbooks, to copies after old master prints and preparatory drawings for important projects. As the first North American exhibition devoted to Delacroix’s drawings in more than 50 years, it will introduce a new generation to the artist’s draftsmanship.

More
Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on July 16 Mon Met – Devotion to Drawing: The Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix at The Met (Jul 1-Nov 12)

Jul 2 Mon Met Breuer – Obsession: Nudes by Klimt, Schiele, and Picasso (Jul 3 Tue to Oct 7 Sun)

Gustav Klimt (Austrian, 1862–1918). Reclining Nude with Drapery, Back View (detail), ca. 1917–1918. Graphite, 14 5/8 x 22 3/8 in. (37.1 x 56.8 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Bequest of Scofield Thayer, 1982

Gustav Klimt (Austrian, 1862–1918). Reclining Nude with Drapery, Back View (detail), ca. 1917–1918. Graphite, 14 5/8 x 22 3/8 in. (37.1 x 56.8 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Bequest of Scofield Thayer, 1982

At The Met Breuer this summer, the exhibition Obsession: Nudes by Klimt, Schiele, and Picasso from the Scofield Thayer Collection ‘will present a selection from The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Scofield Thayer Collection of some 50 erotic and evocative watercolors, drawings, and prints by Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, and Pablo Picasso, whose subjects, except for a handful, are nudes. The exhibition will provide a focused look at this important collection and mark the first time this brilliant group of works are being shown together; it also marks the centenary of the death of Klimt and Schiele.

An aesthete and scion of a wealthy family, Scofield Thayer (1889–1982) was co-publisher and editor of the literary magazine the Dial from 1919 to 1926. In this avant-garde journal he introduced Americans to the writings of T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, D.H. Lawrence, Arthur Schnitzler, Thomas Mann, and Marcel Proust, among others. He frequently accompanied these writers’ contributions with reproductions of modern art. Thayer assembled his large collection of some 600 works—mostly works on paper—with staggering speed in London, Paris, Berlin, and Vienna between 1921 and 1923. While he was a patient of Sigmund Freud in Vienna, he acquired a large group of watercolors and drawings by Schiele and Klimt, artists who at that time were unknown in America. When a selection from his collection was shown at the Montross Gallery in New York in 1924—five years before the Museum of Modern Art opened—it won acclaim. It found no favor, however, in Thayer’s native city, Worcester, Massachusetts, that same year when it was shown at the Worcester Art Museum. Incensed, Thayer draw up his will in 1925 leaving his collection to The Metropolitan Museum of Art. He withdrew from public life in the late 1920s and lived as a recluse on Martha’s Vineyard and in Florida until his death in 1982.

Obsession: Nudes by Klimt, Schiele and Picasso from the Scofield Thayer Collection is organized by Sabine Rewald, the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Curator for Modern Art in the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Reclining Nude Artist:Egon Schiele (Austrian, Tulln 1890–1918 Vienna) Date:1917 Medium:Charcoal on paper

Reclining Nude
Artist:Egon Schiele (Austrian, Tulln 1890–1918 Vienna)
Date:1917
Medium:Charcoal on paper

More
Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Jul 2 Mon Met Breuer – Obsession: Nudes by Klimt, Schiele, and Picasso (Jul 3 Tue to Oct 7 Sun)

Jun 25 Mon Met African American Portraits: Photographs from the 1940s and 1950s Howard Gilman Gallery 852, 2nd Floor (Jun 26 Tue–Oct 8 Sun, 2018)

Unknown American makers and Daisy Studio (American, active 1940s). Studio Portraits, 1940s-50s. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Twentieth-Century Photography Fund, 2015, 2017

Unknown American makers and Daisy Studio (American, active 1940s). Studio Portraits, 1940s-50s. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Twentieth-Century Photography Fund, 2015, 2017

As the UN finds that 20 per cent of America lives in poverty, and 18.5% in extreme poverty, and the release of the film “The King” shames Elvis for not marching with King, a show by the Met is poignant with political and social relevance as it adds dignity to the oppressed, especially those oppressed by the racism endemic in the country now taken over by the extreme capitalism which now enables it more than ever.

African American Portraits: Photographs from the 1940s and 1950s, on view June 26 through October 8, 2018, will present more than 150 studio portraits from the mid-20th century. The exhibition offers a seldom seen view of the African American experience in the United States during World War II and the following decade—a time of war, middle-class growth, and seismic cultural change. Part of an important acquisition made by The Met in 2015 and 2017, these photographs build on and expand the Museum’s strong holdings in portraiture from the beginning of photography in the 1840s to the present.

The exhibition is made possible by the Alfred Stieglitz Society.

The portraits on view generally feature sitters in a frontal pose against a painted backdrop—soldiers and sailors model their uniforms, graduates wear their caps and gowns, lovers embrace, and new parents cradle their infants. Both photographers and subjects remain mostly unidentified.

In the wartime economy, photographic studios became hubs of activity for local and regional communities. Some studios were small and transient, others more established and identifiable, such as the Daisy Studio in Memphis, Tennessee. Using waterproof direct positive paper rather than film, the studios were able to offer their clientele high-quality, inexpensive portraits in a matter of minutes. The poignancy of these small photographs lies in the essential respect the camera offers its subjects, who sit for their portraits as an act of self-expression.

African American Portraits: Photographs from the 1940s and 1950s is organized by Jeff L. Rosenheim, Joyce Frank Menschel Curator in Charge of the Department of Photographs at The Met.

The exhibition will be featured on the Museum’s website, as well as on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter using the hashtag #AfricanAmericanPortraits.

Exhibition Dates: June 26–October 8, 2018
Exhibition Location:
The Met Fifth Avenue, Floor 2,
The Howard Gilman Gallery, Gallery 852
Press Viewing: Monday, June 25, 10 am–noon

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Jun 25 Mon Met African American Portraits: Photographs from the 1940s and 1950s Howard Gilman Gallery 852, 2nd Floor (Jun 26 Tue–Oct 8 Sun, 2018)

Jun 1 Fri-3 Sun Resurgent Left Forum Swings Its Pendulum

Left’s Showcase of Ideas Returns as November Looms

Capitalism’s Flaws Compete with Political Decadence for Solutions

Election Reform, Social Media, Grassroots Mass Movement, Female Political Equality Keys to Pendulum Swing Back

A Resurgent, Reorganized Left Forum starts Friday June 1st through Sunday June 3rd. and this is the newly clarified program making attendance at selected sessions easier:

June 1-3, NYC: The theme of Left Forum 2018 will be:

Towards a New Strategy for the Left

The Trump presidency has brought the most dangerous and oppressive aspects of America – rapacious capitalism and foundational racism and misogyny – out of the shadows and into a chillingly clear light. And we are seeing a rising tide of the reactionary right all over the western world.

Still, our own movements – for worker power, race, gender, and sexuality justice, ecological healing, anti-war and a broad anti-white-nationalist front – while under attack, are also on the rise. These are dangerous but invigorating times for a left resurgence. To make gains, to win battles, we must build a strong unified left which moves beyond the constructed dichotomies of class and identity, violence and nonviolence, reform and revolution.

Fragmentation remains an obstacle to our power today. But we do not need a rigid consensus in order to build together. Unity allows for differences and embraces other voices—it does not squelch them. We do not have to block dissent and critical self-analysis. What we do need is to build broad coalitions for freedom and justice and strengthen each other in our efforts to push the reactionary demagogues back into obsolescence. The time for action is now.

And the space for left unity and power building is Left Forum 2018!

Conference Pledge & Objectives:

The left has a uniquely robust power source gathering at the intersection of issues, identities, ideologies, and constituencies. There are so many examples of this model of convergence and creative action today. This is the model on which we come together to formulate new strategies for a new world. Left Forum 2018 will:

*create generous, open, vibrant, interdisciplinary, and compelling spaces that will serve to transform ideas into action.
*identify and expand the common ground among movements, constituencies, issues, and ideas in a forum where a broad range of minds, issues, communities, affinities, identities, and strategies converge
*enable the cross-pollination of academic research and field organizing
*organize panels and presentations as we have in the past. However, we will also achieve this through skill-shares, workshops, performances, network-building sessions, strategy round-tables, curated exhibits, screenings, and forecasting briefings.
*extend our market/exhibitions to include more vendors
be a place of friendship, exchange, and discovery, where we build our power to make radical change in a world on fire with both chaos and the opportunity for transformation.

All our enemies have is division and destruction. Left Forum can be a living example of the exact opposite: a new convergence and a space for possibility, for hope, and for power.

Sincerely,

Ashley Abbott and Marcus Graetsch
Left Forum Co-Directors
——————————————
Live Stream of all plenaries
https://www.leftforum.org/
Friday, June 1st 6:00PM (Eastern Daylight Time)
Saturday, June 2nd 6:00PM (Eastern Daylight Time)
Sunday, June 3rd 4:00PM (Eastern Daylight Time)

Friday June 1st, 2018

A Broken System: How We Got Here
Richard D. Wolff Moderator
Gayle McLaughlin Candidate for Lieutenant Governor of California
Jumaane Williams Council member 45th District NYC
Jane Sanders Sanders Institute
Doors Open 6:00 PM
Auditorium/Gymnasium, 4th Floor, New Building
John Jay College of Criminal Justice
899 10th Avenue (between 58th and 59th Streets),
New York, NY 10019
——————————————–
Saturday June 2nd, 2018

One Fight, Many Fronts
Silvia Federici Scholar-Activist Author of “Caliban and the Witch” and “Revolution at Point Zero: Housework, Reproduction, and Feminist Struggle”
Georger Ciccariello-Maher Professor, Author of “Decolonizing Dialectics”
Juan Gonzalez Democracy Now!
Gerald Horne Professor and Historian
Paul Jay The Real News Network
**Followed by a book-signing with all speakers**

Doors Open 6:00 PM
Auditorium/Gymnasium, 4th Floor, New Building
John Jay College of Criminal Justice
899 10th Avenue (between 58th and 59th Streets),
New York, NY 10019

——————————————-
Sunday June 3rd, 2018

A Vision Moving Foward

Cathy Dang CAAAV, Executive Director
Kali Akuno Cooperation Jackson
Bhairavi Desai New York Taxi Workers Alliance
Ajamu Baraka 2016 Vice-Presidential Candidate, Green Party
Mark Winston-Griffith Brooklyn Movement Center

Doors Open 4:00 PM
Auditorium/Gymnasium, 4th Floor, New Building
John Jay College of Criminal Justice
899 10th Avenue (between 58th and 59th Streets),
New York, NY 10019
———————————————
Links to sessions sorted by different topics
(Full Political and Economic Session shown in expansion below – Click More link below)

Politics
Economy
Gender and Sexuality
Environment
Theory and History
International
Race
Creativity
COMPLETE SCHEDULE OF ALL SESSIONS
———————————————-
Sanctuary at #Leftforum2018
This year, we are officially declaring Left Forum 2018 to be a sanctuary

This year, we are officially declaring Left Forum 2018 to be a sanctuary space for the duration of the conference. This is something that has always been in accordance with our values, principles, and mission. That said, now, more than ever, we feel it is necessary to state this outright. By doing this we are committing to:

Providing a safe space for all – a space free of discrimination; a space where people will not be mistreated because of their race, gender or gender expression, ethnicity, immigration status, sexual orientation, ability, or religious faith (or lackthereof).
Protect any information on immigration status of all members, staff, artists, and visitors in any way possible and to the best of our abilities.

Our organizers will be participating in a training to ensure all is in accordance with the principles of the sanctuary movement. Participation in art, culture, and education should take place free of fear – we are committed to ensuring this at Left Forum 2018.
——————————————

More (Very Long)- The Political Forum sessions and the Economic sessions
Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Jun 1 Fri-3 Sun Resurgent Left Forum Swings Its Pendulum

May 31 Thu-Jun 1 Fri Book Expo Exhibits Javits

ABOUT BOOKEXPO
BookExpo is North America’s largest gathering of book trade professionals attracting an audience from around the globe. The event is being re-designed to be the place where the business of bookselling gets done in North America. It’s the place where industry, authors and readers converge to define the direction of the publishing industry for years to come. BookExpo provides a focused professional environment to discover emerging authors and the next blockbuster titles, engage with the world’s most influential publishers and learn from industry leaders and peers. BookExpo is organized with the support of association partners including the Association of American Publishers (AAP), the American Booksellers Association (ABA) and the Association of Authors’ Representatives (AAR).

BookExpo 2018: Reed Primes a ‘Reimagined’ BookExpo
The show organizer has instituted a number of changes to increase the interaction between book buyers and authors
By Jim Milliot | May 11, 2018
For the second time in two years, Reed Exhibitions is making significant changes to BookExpo. To give more focus to the 2017 event, Reed shortened the number of days the exhibit floor at New York City’s Javits Center was open from three to two, while holding panels and other events on the Wednesday before the floor opened. In 2018 Reed has implemented a new schedule. Publishers who do not want to participate in BookCon, which runs June 2–3, immediately following BookExpo, have the option to open their booths from May 30 to June 1. Publishers who want to take part in both BookExpo and BookCon will be at the Javits for four days—two days at BookExpo and two days at BookCon. There is also a third option for publishers, exhibiting just at BookCon.

Ed Several, senior v-p of BookExpo, says Reed made the change after talking to publishers and others. “Some of our customers wanted three full days for BookExpo, so we made the change to accommodate them,” he notes. Approximately 150 exhibitors have signed on for the three-day BookExpo show.

More
Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on May 31 Thu-Jun 1 Fri Book Expo Exhibits Javits

May 29 6.30pm Tues Book Culture Columbus/81 Steve Brill reads from Tailspin: The People and Forces Behind America’s Fifty Year Fall–and Those Fighting to Reverse It

May 29 Tues Book Culture Columbus/81 Steve Brill reads from Tailspin: The People and Forces Behind America’s Fifty Year Fall–and Those Fighting to Reverse It

http://time.com/5280446/baby-boomer-generation-america-steve-brill/

Overview (Barnes and Noble)
Tailspin: The People and Forces Behind America’s Fifty-Year Fall–and Those Fighting to Reverse It by Steven Brill
From the award-winning journalist and best-selling author of America’s Bitter Pill: a tour de force examination of 1) how and why major American institutions no longer serve us as they should, causing a deep rift between the vulnerable majority and the protected few, and 2) how some individuals and organizations are laying the foundation for real, lasting change.

More
Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on May 29 6.30pm Tues Book Culture Columbus/81 Steve Brill reads from Tailspin: The People and Forces Behind America’s Fifty Year Fall–and Those Fighting to Reverse It