Jul 24 Tue Century Foundation – Panel on Immigration Support in American Policy (Natalia Aristizabal-Betancur, Paige Austin, Tom Ikeda)

From the incarceration of Japanese-Americans during WWII to Trump-era initiatives like the Muslim Ban and family separation, American policy has too often framed immigrants, people of color, and religious minorities as a threat. What can we do to cut through this cycle of fear and support change that honors the history of this country and the diverse people that built it?

Join us on Tuesday, July 24 at 6:00 p.m. for a thought-provoking discussion and hear the stories of those of us affected by these policies, how those stories illuminate the issue, and how to move forward.

Featuring:

Natalia Aristizabal-Betancur, Co-Director of Organizing, Make the Road
Paige Austin, Staff Attorney, New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU)
Tom Ikeda, Executive Director, Densho
About Think. Drink. Mingle.
Every summer, The Century Foundation hosts a series of events bringing together civically engaged professionals working in NYC to expand their networks and discuss policies that promise to build a better future—all while enjoying a spread of wine and cheese. Whether you’re new to the city, here for the summer, or just really enjoy meeting other incredibly smart people, you’re invited to join us as we share a drink (or two) and discuss issues that matter.

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July 16 Mon Met – Devotion to Drawing: The Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix at The Met (Jul 1-Nov 12)

 Eugène Delacroix (French, 1798–1863). The Giaour on Horseback, 1824–26. Pen and iron gall ink with wash over graphite. 7 15/16 x 12 in. (20.1 x 30.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift from the Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix, in honor of Jane Roberts, 2015

Eugène Delacroix (French, 1798–1863). The Giaour on Horseback, 1824–26. Pen and iron gall ink with wash over graphite. 7 15/16 x 12 in. (20.1 x 30.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift from the Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix, in honor of Jane Roberts, 2015

Devotion to Drawing: The Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix—on view at The Met July 17 through November 12, 2018—will expand upon a major aspect of the artist’s production: his endlessly inventive work as a draftsman. The exhibition celebrates a collector’s generous gift to the Museum of some 130 drawings by Delacroix by the collector Karen B. Cohen. It is organized by Ashley Dunn, Assistant Curator in The Met’s Department of Drawings and Prints. The exhibition is made possible by The Schiff Foundation. The catalogue is made possible in part by The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation.

Renowned as a giant of French Romantic painting, Eugène Delacroix (1798–1863) was equally a dedicated and innovative draftsman. Opening on July 17, this exhibition will explore the central role of drawing in the artist’s practice through more than one hundred works—from finished watercolors and sketchbooks, to copies after old master prints and preparatory drawings for important projects. As the first North American exhibition devoted to Delacroix’s drawings in more than 50 years, it will introduce a new generation to the artist’s draftsmanship.

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Jul 2 Mon Met Breuer – Obsession: Nudes by Klimt, Schiele, and Picasso (Jul 3 Tue to Oct 7 Sun)

Gustav Klimt (Austrian, 1862–1918). Reclining Nude with Drapery, Back View (detail), ca. 1917–1918. Graphite, 14 5/8 x 22 3/8 in. (37.1 x 56.8 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Bequest of Scofield Thayer, 1982

Gustav Klimt (Austrian, 1862–1918). Reclining Nude with Drapery, Back View (detail), ca. 1917–1918. Graphite, 14 5/8 x 22 3/8 in. (37.1 x 56.8 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Bequest of Scofield Thayer, 1982

At The Met Breuer this summer, the exhibition Obsession: Nudes by Klimt, Schiele, and Picasso from the Scofield Thayer Collection ‘will present a selection from The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Scofield Thayer Collection of some 50 erotic and evocative watercolors, drawings, and prints by Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, and Pablo Picasso, whose subjects, except for a handful, are nudes. The exhibition will provide a focused look at this important collection and mark the first time this brilliant group of works are being shown together; it also marks the centenary of the death of Klimt and Schiele.

An aesthete and scion of a wealthy family, Scofield Thayer (1889–1982) was co-publisher and editor of the literary magazine the Dial from 1919 to 1926. In this avant-garde journal he introduced Americans to the writings of T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, D.H. Lawrence, Arthur Schnitzler, Thomas Mann, and Marcel Proust, among others. He frequently accompanied these writers’ contributions with reproductions of modern art. Thayer assembled his large collection of some 600 works—mostly works on paper—with staggering speed in London, Paris, Berlin, and Vienna between 1921 and 1923. While he was a patient of Sigmund Freud in Vienna, he acquired a large group of watercolors and drawings by Schiele and Klimt, artists who at that time were unknown in America. When a selection from his collection was shown at the Montross Gallery in New York in 1924—five years before the Museum of Modern Art opened—it won acclaim. It found no favor, however, in Thayer’s native city, Worcester, Massachusetts, that same year when it was shown at the Worcester Art Museum. Incensed, Thayer draw up his will in 1925 leaving his collection to The Metropolitan Museum of Art. He withdrew from public life in the late 1920s and lived as a recluse on Martha’s Vineyard and in Florida until his death in 1982.

Obsession: Nudes by Klimt, Schiele and Picasso from the Scofield Thayer Collection is organized by Sabine Rewald, the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Curator for Modern Art in the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Reclining Nude Artist:Egon Schiele (Austrian, Tulln 1890–1918 Vienna) Date:1917 Medium:Charcoal on paper

Reclining Nude
Artist:Egon Schiele (Austrian, Tulln 1890–1918 Vienna)
Date:1917
Medium:Charcoal on paper

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Jun 25 Mon Met African American Portraits: Photographs from the 1940s and 1950s Howard Gilman Gallery 852, 2nd Floor (Jun 26 Tue–Oct 8 Sun, 2018)

Unknown American makers and Daisy Studio (American, active 1940s). Studio Portraits, 1940s-50s. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Twentieth-Century Photography Fund, 2015, 2017

Unknown American makers and Daisy Studio (American, active 1940s). Studio Portraits, 1940s-50s. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Twentieth-Century Photography Fund, 2015, 2017

As the UN finds that 20 per cent of America lives in poverty, and 18.5% in extreme poverty, and the release of the film “The King” shames Elvis for not marching with King, a show by the Met is poignant with political and social relevance as it adds dignity to the oppressed, especially those oppressed by the racism endemic in the country now taken over by the extreme capitalism which now enables it more than ever.

African American Portraits: Photographs from the 1940s and 1950s, on view June 26 through October 8, 2018, will present more than 150 studio portraits from the mid-20th century. The exhibition offers a seldom seen view of the African American experience in the United States during World War II and the following decade—a time of war, middle-class growth, and seismic cultural change. Part of an important acquisition made by The Met in 2015 and 2017, these photographs build on and expand the Museum’s strong holdings in portraiture from the beginning of photography in the 1840s to the present.

The exhibition is made possible by the Alfred Stieglitz Society.

The portraits on view generally feature sitters in a frontal pose against a painted backdrop—soldiers and sailors model their uniforms, graduates wear their caps and gowns, lovers embrace, and new parents cradle their infants. Both photographers and subjects remain mostly unidentified.

In the wartime economy, photographic studios became hubs of activity for local and regional communities. Some studios were small and transient, others more established and identifiable, such as the Daisy Studio in Memphis, Tennessee. Using waterproof direct positive paper rather than film, the studios were able to offer their clientele high-quality, inexpensive portraits in a matter of minutes. The poignancy of these small photographs lies in the essential respect the camera offers its subjects, who sit for their portraits as an act of self-expression.

African American Portraits: Photographs from the 1940s and 1950s is organized by Jeff L. Rosenheim, Joyce Frank Menschel Curator in Charge of the Department of Photographs at The Met.

The exhibition will be featured on the Museum’s website, as well as on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter using the hashtag #AfricanAmericanPortraits.

Exhibition Dates: June 26–October 8, 2018
Exhibition Location:
The Met Fifth Avenue, Floor 2,
The Howard Gilman Gallery, Gallery 852
Press Viewing: Monday, June 25, 10 am–noon

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Jun 1 Fri-3 Sun Resurgent Left Forum Swings Its Pendulum

Left’s Showcase of Ideas Returns as November Looms

Capitalism’s Flaws Compete with Political Decadence for Solutions

Election Reform, Social Media, Grassroots Mass Movement, Female Political Equality Keys to Pendulum Swing Back

A Resurgent, Reorganized Left Forum starts Friday June 1st through Sunday June 3rd. and this is the newly clarified program making attendance at selected sessions easier:

June 1-3, NYC: The theme of Left Forum 2018 will be:

Towards a New Strategy for the Left

The Trump presidency has brought the most dangerous and oppressive aspects of America – rapacious capitalism and foundational racism and misogyny – out of the shadows and into a chillingly clear light. And we are seeing a rising tide of the reactionary right all over the western world.

Still, our own movements – for worker power, race, gender, and sexuality justice, ecological healing, anti-war and a broad anti-white-nationalist front – while under attack, are also on the rise. These are dangerous but invigorating times for a left resurgence. To make gains, to win battles, we must build a strong unified left which moves beyond the constructed dichotomies of class and identity, violence and nonviolence, reform and revolution.

Fragmentation remains an obstacle to our power today. But we do not need a rigid consensus in order to build together. Unity allows for differences and embraces other voices—it does not squelch them. We do not have to block dissent and critical self-analysis. What we do need is to build broad coalitions for freedom and justice and strengthen each other in our efforts to push the reactionary demagogues back into obsolescence. The time for action is now.

And the space for left unity and power building is Left Forum 2018!

Conference Pledge & Objectives:

The left has a uniquely robust power source gathering at the intersection of issues, identities, ideologies, and constituencies. There are so many examples of this model of convergence and creative action today. This is the model on which we come together to formulate new strategies for a new world. Left Forum 2018 will:

*create generous, open, vibrant, interdisciplinary, and compelling spaces that will serve to transform ideas into action.
*identify and expand the common ground among movements, constituencies, issues, and ideas in a forum where a broad range of minds, issues, communities, affinities, identities, and strategies converge
*enable the cross-pollination of academic research and field organizing
*organize panels and presentations as we have in the past. However, we will also achieve this through skill-shares, workshops, performances, network-building sessions, strategy round-tables, curated exhibits, screenings, and forecasting briefings.
*extend our market/exhibitions to include more vendors
be a place of friendship, exchange, and discovery, where we build our power to make radical change in a world on fire with both chaos and the opportunity for transformation.

All our enemies have is division and destruction. Left Forum can be a living example of the exact opposite: a new convergence and a space for possibility, for hope, and for power.

Sincerely,

Ashley Abbott and Marcus Graetsch
Left Forum Co-Directors
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Live Stream of all plenaries
https://www.leftforum.org/
Friday, June 1st 6:00PM (Eastern Daylight Time)
Saturday, June 2nd 6:00PM (Eastern Daylight Time)
Sunday, June 3rd 4:00PM (Eastern Daylight Time)

Friday June 1st, 2018

A Broken System: How We Got Here
Richard D. Wolff Moderator
Gayle McLaughlin Candidate for Lieutenant Governor of California
Jumaane Williams Council member 45th District NYC
Jane Sanders Sanders Institute
Doors Open 6:00 PM
Auditorium/Gymnasium, 4th Floor, New Building
John Jay College of Criminal Justice
899 10th Avenue (between 58th and 59th Streets),
New York, NY 10019
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Saturday June 2nd, 2018

One Fight, Many Fronts
Silvia Federici Scholar-Activist Author of “Caliban and the Witch” and “Revolution at Point Zero: Housework, Reproduction, and Feminist Struggle”
Georger Ciccariello-Maher Professor, Author of “Decolonizing Dialectics”
Juan Gonzalez Democracy Now!
Gerald Horne Professor and Historian
Paul Jay The Real News Network
**Followed by a book-signing with all speakers**

Doors Open 6:00 PM
Auditorium/Gymnasium, 4th Floor, New Building
John Jay College of Criminal Justice
899 10th Avenue (between 58th and 59th Streets),
New York, NY 10019

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Sunday June 3rd, 2018

A Vision Moving Foward

Cathy Dang CAAAV, Executive Director
Kali Akuno Cooperation Jackson
Bhairavi Desai New York Taxi Workers Alliance
Ajamu Baraka 2016 Vice-Presidential Candidate, Green Party
Mark Winston-Griffith Brooklyn Movement Center

Doors Open 4:00 PM
Auditorium/Gymnasium, 4th Floor, New Building
John Jay College of Criminal Justice
899 10th Avenue (between 58th and 59th Streets),
New York, NY 10019
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Links to sessions sorted by different topics
(Full Political and Economic Session shown in expansion below – Click More link below)

Politics
Economy
Gender and Sexuality
Environment
Theory and History
International
Race
Creativity
COMPLETE SCHEDULE OF ALL SESSIONS
———————————————-
Sanctuary at #Leftforum2018
This year, we are officially declaring Left Forum 2018 to be a sanctuary

This year, we are officially declaring Left Forum 2018 to be a sanctuary space for the duration of the conference. This is something that has always been in accordance with our values, principles, and mission. That said, now, more than ever, we feel it is necessary to state this outright. By doing this we are committing to:

Providing a safe space for all – a space free of discrimination; a space where people will not be mistreated because of their race, gender or gender expression, ethnicity, immigration status, sexual orientation, ability, or religious faith (or lackthereof).
Protect any information on immigration status of all members, staff, artists, and visitors in any way possible and to the best of our abilities.

Our organizers will be participating in a training to ensure all is in accordance with the principles of the sanctuary movement. Participation in art, culture, and education should take place free of fear – we are committed to ensuring this at Left Forum 2018.
——————————————

More (Very Long)- The Political Forum sessions and the Economic sessions
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May 31 Thu-Jun 1 Fri Book Expo Exhibits Javits

ABOUT BOOKEXPO
BookExpo is North America’s largest gathering of book trade professionals attracting an audience from around the globe. The event is being re-designed to be the place where the business of bookselling gets done in North America. It’s the place where industry, authors and readers converge to define the direction of the publishing industry for years to come. BookExpo provides a focused professional environment to discover emerging authors and the next blockbuster titles, engage with the world’s most influential publishers and learn from industry leaders and peers. BookExpo is organized with the support of association partners including the Association of American Publishers (AAP), the American Booksellers Association (ABA) and the Association of Authors’ Representatives (AAR).

BookExpo 2018: Reed Primes a ‘Reimagined’ BookExpo
The show organizer has instituted a number of changes to increase the interaction between book buyers and authors
By Jim Milliot | May 11, 2018
For the second time in two years, Reed Exhibitions is making significant changes to BookExpo. To give more focus to the 2017 event, Reed shortened the number of days the exhibit floor at New York City’s Javits Center was open from three to two, while holding panels and other events on the Wednesday before the floor opened. In 2018 Reed has implemented a new schedule. Publishers who do not want to participate in BookCon, which runs June 2–3, immediately following BookExpo, have the option to open their booths from May 30 to June 1. Publishers who want to take part in both BookExpo and BookCon will be at the Javits for four days—two days at BookExpo and two days at BookCon. There is also a third option for publishers, exhibiting just at BookCon.

Ed Several, senior v-p of BookExpo, says Reed made the change after talking to publishers and others. “Some of our customers wanted three full days for BookExpo, so we made the change to accommodate them,” he notes. Approximately 150 exhibitors have signed on for the three-day BookExpo show.

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May 29 6.30pm Tues Book Culture Columbus/81 Steve Brill reads from Tailspin: The People and Forces Behind America’s Fifty Year Fall–and Those Fighting to Reverse It

May 29 Tues Book Culture Columbus/81 Steve Brill reads from Tailspin: The People and Forces Behind America’s Fifty Year Fall–and Those Fighting to Reverse It

http://time.com/5280446/baby-boomer-generation-america-steve-brill/

Overview (Barnes and Noble)
Tailspin: The People and Forces Behind America’s Fifty-Year Fall–and Those Fighting to Reverse It by Steven Brill
From the award-winning journalist and best-selling author of America’s Bitter Pill: a tour de force examination of 1) how and why major American institutions no longer serve us as they should, causing a deep rift between the vulnerable majority and the protected few, and 2) how some individuals and organizations are laying the foundation for real, lasting change.

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May 17 Thu 7.30pm BAM Fisher – Flamenco Vivo Carlota Santana

Snap, stamp, explode
The theme of New York is release of energy and there is nothing more suitable to express it than Flamenco Vivo which celebrated its 35th anniversary this week with a double header nightly wrapping intermission with a story telling sequence in the first half in relevant costumes recalling the bravery of two early pioneers of women’s self liberation to live the lives they were born for in Mexico in the 17th and the 19th Centuries, and then a second half of contemporary flamenco of great variety and artistic ambition culminating in individual solos by every member of the company of spontaneous originality accompanied by superb and equally inspired guitar and vocals which seemed to combine the electric energy of the city with the almost savage yet contained strutting and stamping and rapidly succeeding postures which propels the audience into the same rapturous and joyous extreme with its direct sexualisation of the power of loud clapping and rigid poses to focus on the seductions of athletic limbs and taut muscles against the backdrop of snapping guitar chords and runs and strumming that make flamenco the most gut stirring of all dance forms. Ole!

NYC Season 2018: May 15-20 at BAM Fisher
Flamenco Vivo celebrates its 35th anniversary season May 15-20 at BAM Fisher with a program of new works featuring the New York premiere of Mujeres Valientes by renowned flamenco artist Belén Maya, and new solos by José Maldonado and Guadalupe Torres, all accompanied by live music.

BAM FISHER
May 15-20, 2018
For its anniversary season, Flamenco Vivo will premiere Mujeres Valientes, a new work by flamenco legend Belén Maya that explores the fundamental power and courage of 17th-century Mexican poet and philosopher Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, and 19th-century activist and South American revolutionary Manuela Sáenz. Mujeres draws on the stories of these two trailblazing women, who, over the centuries, have challenged authorities and fought against ignorance, inequality, and injustice. The second half of the program will also feature new solos by José Maldonado and Guadalupe Torres, giving the audience an opportunity to witness the kind of electrifying artistry that has won them prizes in Spain. Maldonado and Torres all come to Flamenco Vivo through a partnership with Madrid’s El Certamen de Coreografía de Danza Española y Flamenco, the famous competition for up-and-coming talent in Spain. The program features Flamenco Vivo’s international company of eight dancers and five musicians, with all works performed to live music.

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May 12 Sat 3-5pm Choral Society at Grace Church 11St and Bway

The Choral Society performing annual holiday concert at the Grace Chruch, 12/6/14. Photo by Chris Lee

Harmony restored
Magnificent rich choral harmonies filled the classical architecture of Manhattan’s first major refuge for the early elite of the city before it expanded uptown, matching the beautiful curves of the ceiling and colors of the stained glass with timeless harmonies from the calm repose of Bernstein’s Missa Brevis back in time through the Psalm arranged by Virgil Thomson in 1937 and the Alleluia by Randall Thompson of 1940 to the joyous last Mass No 14 by Haydn, the Harmoniemesse which capped his always musical contentment at life and his God (“I cannot think of Him without simple happiness”), all against the suitably grey skies outside which nonetheless made colors brighter and added a fillip of appropriateness of being inside this packed but tall space listening to this parade of ever more satisfying music which formed the perfect farewell to the few cold days still jumping into the calendar as the season dips its toes into warm summer, and the smoothly controlling baton of music director John Maclay brought forth all the warmth and expectation of salvation in Haydn’s heart in his final days of composing his greatest tribute to life and all it offers on earth and in heaven, leaving the audience in sanguine harmony as they exited and chattered for many minutes outside sharing their upbeat mood.

2018 Spring Concert
Saturday, May 12, 2018
3:00 PM 4:10 PM
Grace Church in New York (map)
Leonard Bernstein: Missa Brevis (Kyrie and Gloria)
arr. Virgil Thomson: My Shepherd Shall Supply My Need
Randall Thompson: Alleluia
Joseph Haydn: Mass No. 14 in B-flat (“Harmoniemesse”)
A concert in honor of Leonard Bernstein – works by Bernstein and friends, including one of Haydn’s most resplendent late masterworks

Tami Petty, soprano
Helen Karloski, mezzo-soprano
Joshua Glassman, tenor
Douglas Williams, bass-baritone

Concert length: c. 70 minutes with no intermission

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Apr 27 Fri Molly Barnes at the Roger Smith Hotel Invites Joseph Giovannini – the Architecture Critic of the New York Times

Art to live with
Imposing at some 6ft 3 in tall, Joseph Giovannini is nonetheless a gentle man to talk to even though he is a major disruptive force in a new form of internal architectural art he has pioneered from the early noughts this century which he has named Deconstructivism, and approachable despite his high flying kite tail of institutional affiliations from Harvard to Yale to the Times and the New Yorker and many more, as well as innumerable awards for his thoughtful and appreciative writing about other people’s work, of which no doubt there will be more for his upcoming book Architecture Unbound, for in this case his intellectually well worked out writing, of which he read out samples to do with historical context to introduce his latest work in architecture, will be applied to explaining the roots of the very remarkable new path he is pioneering inspired by the work of Russian avant garde artist El Lissitzky and his paintings of floating geometrical objects, in placing inside rooms and staircases and halls various artistic constructions in spaces otherwise devoted to mundane living and working activities such as sitting or preparing food or sleeping or climbing stairs so that at first glance they look like free floating abstract exhibits in some domesticated art gallery where the owners were unable to pay the rent on their homes as well as the commercial premises, because they combine both uses into one, although in the slides he showed ordinary functions are completely hidden from the eye by the white curved walls of his adaptations which visually replace and hide the vertical and horizontal rectangles of typical bedroom and living room and kitchen spaces as we know them in daily life, and so renters walk into an initially disorientating experience where they might think themselves stepping off the earth into the vertiginous emptiness of outer space among the stars where every white surface and wall of his constructions is curved and dominant and furthermore now incorporates many trompe d’oeil’s in the form of colored rectangles and squares drawn on the surfaces of the ceiling or the walls that appear to be floating in the space, which led us to ask later if Giovannini used light projection to draw them but no, it turned out he uses a laser beam to direct an assistant up a ladder to the ceiling, but while there is no doubt that the shapes he designs deserve and demand priority over mundane needs such as horizontal counters to prepare food in the kitchen, yet he does also provide hidden pull out counters in that case, he explained, but even so it must be a bit of a shock for any visitor who enters his lofts for the first time, lofts now rented in Los Angeles to people who it turns out don’t mind combining their sleeping talking and eating with having their minds blown.

(Web bio) A Pulitzer nominee in criticism who trained in architecture at Harvard, Joseph Giovannini has led a career that has spanned three decades and two coasts. He has served as the architecture critic for New York Magazine and the Los Angeles Herald Examiner, and was long a staff writer on design and architecture for The New York Times. On a contractual or freelance basis, he has contributed to many other publications, including The New Yorker, Architectural Record, Architectural Digest, Art in America, Art Forum, Architecture Magazine, Architect Magazine, Industrial Design Magazine, and Interior Design. A prominent figure in American architecture, he has been an activist critic with a record of discovering emerging talent for major mainstream publications and professional journals. He coined the term Deconstructivism during articles he wrote announcing the movement. Giovannini has written literally thousands of articles for periodicals, and he has also authored numerous essays for books and monographs. As a critic, he has won awards, grants and honors, from the Art World Magazine/Manufacturer’s Hanover Trust for distinguished newspaper architectural criticism, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Graham Foundation, the Los Angeles Chapter of the AIA and the California Council of the AIA. He has put theory into practice in his own architectural practice. Mr. Giovannini heads Giovannini Associates, which has recently completed the conversion of a large trucking warehouse into a community of lofts in Los Angeles, and a 19th-century commercial building, also into lofts. A bicoastal designer, he is currently working on several apartments in New York and lofts in Los Angeles. His lofts, apartments, galleries and additions have appeared in Architectural Digest, Los Angeles Times Magazine, A + U, Domus, House and Garden, GA Houses, Architekur und Wohnen, Sites, and Interior Design. He has taught advanced and graduate design studios at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, UCLA’s Graduate School of Architecture and Urban Planning, the University of Southern California’s School of Architecture, and at the University of Innsbruck. He holds a Master in Architecture from Harvard’s Graduate School of Design. He did his B.A. in English at Yale University, and an M.A in French Language and Literature from Middlebury College for work done at La Sorbonne, Paris.

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Apr 26 Thu – Molly Barnes at the Roger Smith Hotel Invites Mark Kostabi to Explain His Net Worth

Art as phenomenon and propaganda
There is no doubt that Mark Kostabi is in many ways the most interesting figure from late twentieth century art in America, though not necessarily because he is the most accomplished in personally practicing the art that he is known for, in fact there is a considerable body of opinion that rejects his art as not among the best, primarily because it is not entirely his personal creation, as is the work by most other prominent names who have become famous for their creations, and they justify that opinion by pointing out that most of his production is painted according to his instructions by employees in a workshop in New York City, in the manner of artists of global renown in previous centuries who did precisely the same thing, using others to copy and complete their ideas onto canvas, just as today’s interviewers, talk show hosts and comedians on the peaks of US media typically use a squad of interns and researchers to provide them with material to cover in their live performance, though Kostabi’s production of some 40,000 works so far in painting and sculpture is so gargantuan in quantity that as a practical matter he could hardly have done it all by himself, and also despite his continuing huge sales worldwide especially through many galleries around Italy many critics object that the art itself does not appear to them to have enough quality in form or content, and that despite his initial art school promise it has not progressed in these aspects in the forty years since he became as well known as Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat, though we have to say that as Kostabi talked of his career in art, a story which began with thanking Molly Barnes for being his first booster after she sold the twenty surrealist tinged drawings he brought in to her as a teenager overnight, and for advising him to come to New York from Los Angeles as a better fit for his promotional talent than Los Angeles, when he arrived here in his inimitably adventurous style on a free air ticket for delivering some item with barely seven days hotel room in his pocket, and immediately went to see top gallery owner Leon Castelli, agreeing at the reception desk with the suggestion that he was a writer preparing a book on the artists they were showing, all the while during this account on the 16th floor of Roger Smith running a continuous slide show of his work in which the camera moved up and down over the paintings without ever showing the complete image, which might have helped it seem surprisingly pleasing and well composed to us after all, though still it has to be admitted without any impression of depth in feeling or content, perhaps because Kostabi has never abandoned the blank faced window dummy figures he has favored as representations of people since his beginning, which he justified as allowing us to project emotions onto their faces, so when he finished his account of what is undeniably one of the great financial achievements of any contemporary artist, since he is reckoned to have sold some $400 million worth of art under his brand name, as it were, and his sold sculptures have recently touched $295,000 apiece, we took the opportunity to ask as the first question if he felt he had improved as an artist since his early days, with the aim of uncovering what seems to us to be the $400 million mystery of his astonishing and notorious life selling that amount of work, that is, whether he has his own personal measure of what good art is, aside from its stratospheric price, even if he doesn’t recognize that the measures used by the art world groups that criticize and reject his work as bad art are anything but subjective and self interested, at least as far as commerce and prices go, since he has in effect mocked those who rule the vexed crossroads of art and commerce with outrageous comments and postures since his early days, and in one way proved his point by beating them at their own game, by selling far pricier work far longer than most agents and dealers have managed on behalf of most of his colleagues, though not of course superstars like Andy Warhol, who might be said to have led the way in separating art completely from personal expression to serve as a social mirror rather than even commentary, and thus be the inspiration for Kostabi’s famously unapologetic separation of art from any objective evaluation except price, so now we were momentarily surprised to hear him welcome our question upfront as a good one, but soon we realized that as he continued he was appealing once again to his sales success as the measure of his artistic achievement, and our hope that he would refer to his own inner values in estimating his artistic worth and progress was not going to be realized, even though we did ask him once again as a follow up to reveal them, and so were left with the impression that he genuinely felt that the best practice of art amounts to no more than the liberated freedom of the artist to do whatever he wants to do that his talent and technical skills will allow, and that all evaluation of art is in the end a subjective matter and the product of a mental and economic framework in which he has as much right to value his own work for himself as they have, and even provocatively to label it “trash” himself in opposition to their assumptions that work had to have a value of some kind by reference to a measure universally acknowledged as valid, but if the truth be told we did find that after that brief time we decided that the selected works that he showed were better than we expected we ultimately relapsed into the same disappointed and even alienated feeling we had had before that his art is simply missing that element of driven personal expression in its form and content that is surely a characteristic of great or even good art, and later when we mentioned to him in the elevator that in a similar way the overwhelming universal admiration for the music of Beethoven over relatively minor composers was surely not just subjective and dependent on the mental framework through which it is heard, whether one likes his music more than Bernstein, say, or not, we couldn’t get any response from him on that basis, except his usual charming engagement and argument based on the impressive sales value of his work, and we couldn’t help concluding that it was possible that he didn’t have that sensibility in him, and that he genuinely did not know or care what it was, despite his early technical prowess which allowed him to execute cartoons for the New Yorker and similar as soon as he arrived here, and perhaps he had lost along the way the qualities Molly Barnes had perceived at first and had simply become the charming promoter he had always pretended to be to guy the rest of the art business world, but we didn’t feel like arguing because we felt the same warmly warping influence in his presence as others have, and we felt that ultimately, the philosophical question of what good art is is by definition subjective and ultimately indefinable, since it is not a factor in the external universe we all live in but a group effect in the internal psychological universe we all seek to share based on using the language of whichever tribe we belong to, and on that basis Kostabi has every right to quarrel with values of the tribe of dealers and critics who oppose him in America, even if the sheer nihilism of his early days seems to be tempered now by the usual influence of maturity in wanting to be taken back into the fold.

(Kostabi bio) Mark Kostabi was born in Los Angeles in 1960 to Estonian immigrants. Raised in Whittier, California, he studied drawing and painting at California State University, Fullerton. Kostabi moved to New York in 1982, and by 1984, emerged as a leading figure in the East Village art scene where he cultivated a provocative media persona by publishing self-interviews reflecting on the commodification of contemporary art. By 1987, his work was widely exhibited in New York galleries as well as prominently throughout the United States, Japan, Germany and Australia. He inspired extensive international press coverage in 1988 when he founded Kostabi World, his Manhattan art studio, which employs numerous painting assistants and idea people. Beginning in the early 1990s Kostabi’s work has been widely exhibited throughout Italy. Kostabi established a second home in Rome in 1996. Dividing his time between Rome and New York enabled him to dramatically enhance his presence in the Italian art scene.

Kostabi produces a weekly cable TV show, The Kostabi Show, where noted art critics and celebrities compete to title his paintings for cash awards.

From 2000 to 2010 he wrote an advice column for artists, Ask Mark Kostabi, for Artnet.com.

Kostabi has designed album covers for Guns ‘N’ Roses (Use Your Illusion) and The Ramones (Adios Amigos), Jimmy Scott (Holding Back The Years), Seether (Holding Onto Strings Better Left to Fray) and numerous products including a Swatch watch, a Bloomingdales bag, Alessi vases, Rosenthal espresso cups, and a Giro d’Italia pink jersey. Kostabi is also known for his many collaborations with other artists including Enzo Cucchi, Arman, Howard Finster, Tadanori Yokoo, Enrico Baj and Paul Kostabi.

Retrospective exhibitions of Kostabi’s paintings have been held at the Mitsukoshi Museum in Tokyo (1992) and the Art Museum of Estonia in Tallinn (1998). The famous Italian art historian and curator, Vittorio Sgarbi, curated a vast exhibition of 150 Kostabi paintings at the Chiostro del Bramante in Rome in 2006.

Kostabi’s work is in over 50 permanent museum collections, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Guggenheim Museum, the Brooklyn Museum, the National Gallery in Washington D.C., the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, the National Gallery of Modern Art in Rome and the Groninger Museum in Holland. His permanent public works include a mural in Palazzo dei Priori in Arezzo, Italy, a large bronze sculpture in the central square of San Benedetto del Tronto, Italy, and a bronze portrait of Pope John Paul II in Velletri, Italy.

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April 23 Mon Skirball Talks: Marion Nestle on Food Politics with Marian Burros

SKIRBALL TALKS: MARION NESTLE with Marian Burros of NYT

Too much junk
Asked basic questions by her long time supporter Times writer Marian Burros, the very distinguished and independent critic of the food industry’s business overfeeding America junk nutrition mostly responsible for the major killers of this society today, including heart trouble, cancers, obesity diabetes, high blood pressure, and stroke, Marion Nestle was able to mention one of the prime sources of their decades of depredation, which is the capitalist push by shareholders for ever increasing profits has led food companies to make and market nearly double the volume of food that we actually need, so its marketing and advertising have to be strenuous to move its products off the shelves, involving the betrayal of children’s trust in parental guidance, the false blaming of mothers for permissively indulging kids to make them fat (a false perception now largely scotched), the endemic bias of supposedly scientific studies of nutrition, the corruption of government advice to consumers, and the repression of most public criticism of the food industry till recently, with even Nestle unable to find sources among friendly academics, company executives and scientists who were willing to be named in her seminal book of 2002, Food Politics, which first thoroughly exposed the real roots of the problem in oversupply, a triumph of independent and objective academic analysis, especially since Nestle was involved with food companies herself perforce in collecting a complete picture, liaison she clearly delineated in her book, which has had much to do with the boom in organic food in recent years, and now she promises to launch her eleventh book in November on the more specific question of how the food companies supposedly scientific research always seems to end up on their side in evaluating food products, Unsavory Truth: How Food Companies Skew the Science of What We Eat, due out from Basic in October, which triggered a couple of questions from the audience microphone when we reached it, the first being what about doctors, whose training in nutrition surely should be a priority but who so often seem to lack more than an hour or two in it even today, whereupon Nestle lamented that she had taught medical students herself from 1972 to 1986 and seen the problem then and to her chagrin had assessed it recently and “nothing has changed!”, and that part of the problem is lack of enough people who can teach it, “there are just not enough knowledgeable instructors”, and that one one piece of evidence she found was when she was assured by caretakers in one institution there was no dietary lacks there she went with one doing her rounds and found every single patient was in desperate straits nutritionally, even though the right diet for each of the major illnesses like heart disease is well know, leading us to ask the follow up question as to whether there was not a Niagara of papers over the last twenty years showing how powerful the right plant flavonoids and other specific nutrients were in combating illnesses such as cancer, to which she replied that it was not necessary to know of specific papers to know which foods were good for us, and what constitutes a healthy diet, and that Michael Pollan’s rule of thumb Eat food. Not too much. Mainly plants. was good enough, or as she put it, the “healthiest diet is a variety of unprocessed foods”.

Well into a highly successful academic, scientific and public policy career, Dr. Marion Nestle led the way to the development and launch of the country’s first comprehensive Food Studies Program. This game-changing accomplishment has spawned numerous programs, studies, scholars, collections, careers, books and other efforts, forever broadening and deepening the way we look at, talk about, study and experience food in America.

New York University’s Steinhardt School is pleased to celebrate this unique and beloved educator, in conversation with one of the most acclaimed food journalists of her day, and the reporter who broke the story about Nestle and Food Studies, Award winning and retired New York Times writer Marian Burros.

(Wiki) Marion Nestle (born 1936) is an American academic. She is the Paulette Goddard Professor of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health at New York University. She is also a professor of Sociology at NYU and a visiting professor of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell University.

Education
Nestle received her BA from UC Berkeley, Phi Beta Kappa, after attending school there from 1954-1959. Her degrees include a Ph.D in molecular biology and an M.P.H. in public health nutrition, both from the University of California, Berkeley.

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Apr 16 Mon Aliens Land at Met: Huma Bhabha Creates We Come in Peace Installation for the Met’s Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden

Huma Bhabha (born 1962, Karachi, Pakistan), The Roof Garden Commission: Huma Bhabha, We Come in Peace Installation view, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2018. © Huma Bhabha, courtesy of the artist and Salon 94 Image credit: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photograph by Hyla Skopitz

Huma Bhabha (born 1962, Karachi, Pakistan), The Roof Garden Commission: Huma Bhabha, We Come in Peace
Installation view, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2018. © Huma Bhabha, courtesy of the artist and Salon 94
Image credit: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photograph by Hyla Skopitz

Huma Bhabha Named Artist for The Met’s 2018 Cantor Roof Garden Commission

Artist Huma Bhabha (born 1962, Karachi, Pakistan) has been selected to create a site-specific installation for The Met’s Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden. The Roof Garden Commission: Huma Bhabha, We Come in Peace will be on view from April 17 through October 28, 2018 (weather permitting).

The title of the installation, We Come in Peace, has its origins in the classic American science-fiction film The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), a tale of first contact between humans and aliens. The installation’s two sculptures—the 12-foot-tall five-headed intersex figure We Come in Peace, and the 18-foot-long prostrate Benaam (an Urdu word that translates as “without name”)—are carefully oriented toward each other as if they have just landed on The Met’s Cantor Roof. Bhabha has choreographed a dramatic mise-en-scène, inspiring visitors to envision tales of foreign visitation.

Initially handcrafted to scale by the artist from ephemeral materials, such as cork, Styrofoam, air-dried clay, and plastic, the sculptures were then cast in bronze, allowing Bhabha to fashion not simply monumental forms but monuments. The works retain the look of their original materials but now exude an endurance, their distressed, afflicted bodies speaking the common language of life’s precariousness as well as of survival.

Throughout her practice, Bhabha has proposed the body as a site of exchange. The figures here communicate notions of pain and survival: they can be read as both aching and defiant, in agony and unassailable, subjugated and valiant. Bhabha’s work has always had a political exigency and shown a responsiveness to social concerns; We Come in Peace is no exception. It is also a project in dialogue with art history, reflecting Bhabha’s interest in art across time and geography. In these sculptures, one might find references to works that range from ancient African and Indian sculpture to modern creations.

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Apr 9 Mon 6.30pm Skirball Center 566 La Guardia NYU King In The Wilderness and Panel discussion by Executive Producer Trey Ellis, NYU Chief Diversity Officer Dr. Lisa Coleman, and historian David Levering Lewis.

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., right, as seen in “King in the Wilderness.” Credit Underwood Archives/The Image Works/HBO

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., right, as seen in “King in the Wilderness.” Credit Underwood Archives/The Image Works/HBO

King’s crucifixion
A documentary which will be a revelation for those who are not aware that in his last three years Martin Luther King suffered punishing opposition from pro Vietnam war groups and voters and even his one time ally President Johnson, as well as those who objected to him calling attention to black poverty and economic inequality because they felt it diluted his message on racism, conflicts which left him drained and dispirited and by the end fatalistically resigned to the likelihood he would give his life for his views, although he always refused to moderate them one iota for political reasons, and it would remain for the nation to wait fifty years to reach the current reality where his prescient vision would be fully vindicated, as those three aspects of decadence have emerged as the key problems we are still experiencing today – racism, inequality and militarism.

KING IN THE WILDERNESS (2018) 8 p.m. on HBO; also on HBO streaming platforms. As the country honors the legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 50 years after his assassination, this new documentary sheds light on the final chapters of his life. Two of Dr. King’s most notable accomplishments came with the passing of the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act in 1964 and 1965. Yet the period that followed found him castigated by longtime friends and allies as he focused on economic justice and vehemently opposed the Vietnam War. In an interview with The New York Times, the director Peter Kunhardt said that while researching Dr. King’s life, he realized that most accounts summarized his legacy with the “I Have a Dream” speech. He added: “It never went beyond that. So we were pleased to not deal with that aspect and look at the nightmare the dream turned into.”

The Center for the Study of Transformative Lives at NYU is excited to present a special screening of King in the Wilderness, a new HBO film by Peter Kunhardt, centered on the last years of Martin Luther King Jr. This screening is in conjunction with a panel discussion featuring Executive Producer Trey Ellis, NYU Chief Diversity Officer Dr. Lisa Coleman, and Pulitzer-Prize winning historian David Levering Lewis.

This event is presented as part of the new SKIRBALL TALKS series, and is co-sponsored by the NYU Office of Global Inclusion, Diversity, and Strategic Innovation, NYU Tisch, and NYU Steinhardt.

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Apr 9 Mon 10 am–noon Met Tisch Galleries, Gallery 899, 2nd floor: Visitors to Versailles (1682–1789) (April 16–July 29, 2018)

Boîte à portrait of Louis XIV Artist:Miniature portrait by Jean Petitot (Swiss, Geneva 1607–1691 Geneva) Mount maker:Setting by Pierre Le Tessier de Montarsy (French) or his son Pierre (French, 1647–1710) Date:ca. 1668 Medium:Painted enamel on gold, silver, set with ninety-two diamonds Dimensions:2 13/16 × 1 5/8 × 5/16 in. (7.2 × 4.2 × 0.8 cm) Classification:Miniatures Credit Line:Musée du Louvre, Paris, Département des Objets d’Art

Boîte à portrait of Louis XIV
Artist:Miniature portrait by Jean Petitot (Swiss, Geneva 1607–1691 Geneva)
Mount maker:Setting by Pierre Le Tessier de Montarsy (French) or his son Pierre (French, 1647–1710)
Date:ca. 1668
Medium:Painted enamel on gold, silver, set with ninety-two diamonds
Dimensions:2 13/16 × 1 5/8 × 5/16 in. (7.2 × 4.2 × 0.8 cm)
Classification:Miniatures
Credit Line:Musée du Louvre, Paris, Département des Objets d’Art

Visit Versailles at its Peak
In this remarkable exhibition you will find multiple rooms of paintings, furniture and decorative objects as well as many costumes from the period where three Kings of France made the extensive royal palace of Versailles a prize show of France’s best efforts at gilding the craft lily, yielding sumptuous treasures of all kinds so richly decorative and sculpturally exquisite and ornate that even the gold aficianado at the White House would be cowed if he ventures here, and although 21 Century abstract art lovers may well get a touch of aesthetic indigestion by the end they will soon see that the art beneath the gilt in this superb collection emerges to reign supreme,
most notably for example in the sculptured table decorations in the final room but one, or in the examples of embroidery on the clothing of the women presented at Court and even on the men’s suits which were otherwise regular 18th Century, not to mention

Read the caption

Read the caption

The vast tapestry hung at the beginning of Visitors to Versailles

The vast tapestry hung at the beginning of Visitors to Versailles

Detail of the vast tapestry hung at the beginning of Visitors to Versailles

Detail of the vast tapestry hung at the beginning of Visitors to Versailles

the vast carpets and beautifully illustrated tapestries which were often given away to impress visiting ambassadors and kings from as far away as India and beyond, since Versailles over most of its royal lifetime of 1682 to 1789 was a trip for non courtiers both French and far beyond, since it was part of the educational Grand Tour of every wealthy son at the time, and now rather marvelously this exhibition gives all a chance to see what such a visit was like, for it is the first and probably the biggest ever to be devoted to the theme Visitors to Versailles, as the Met has called it, and even if its focus on furnishings and practicalities sounds a touch mundane to the 21 Century art cognoscenti, they should know they’ll never see its like again, and moreover it is one of the shows which expands the Met’s footprint beyond art to human interest and history as it powerfully triggers the imagination as to what it was like to be there then, and even the audio guide has 31 minutes of playing in 3D sound specially recorded in an English country house to echo like the palace’s Hall of Mirrors and other venues for the objets discussed – you should use phones if you listen on the Web, advises Nina Diamond, who set it up – and
French elegance rules throughout even this maxxed out level of royal boasting, which if it excites the desire to possess your own example can satisfy it with current top French porcelain demitasse coffee cups in the store outside the final room, though to be honest the $18 mugs from China seemed finer to us, even if their decoration of a drawing of the Versailles Labyrinth seemed too grey for such distinguished sipping.

The show is a trip back in time and a lot less strenuous than visiting its contemporary version which Thierry Gausserroi the Executive Director of the palace of Versailles says 25,000 are visiting a week (ck) currently of whom 70% were French, 15% US and 12% China. He said he thought the perfect nation would be to take the best of France, England and America and mix them together, then you would have the eccentric character of the English, the elegance of the French and the energy of Americans, but when asked where his close fitting suit was made, Paris or London, and he said it was merely off the rack from Bruce Field in Paris, and laughingly agreed that he had given up competing with his Versailles.

Charles-Gabriel Sauvage, called Lemire père (1741–1827). Figure of Louis XVI and Benjamin Franklin, 1780–85. Porcelain, 12 3/4 x 9 1/2 x 6 in. (32.4 x 24.1 x 15.2 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of William H. Huntington, 1883

Charles-Gabriel Sauvage, called Lemire père (1741–1827). Figure of Louis XVI and Benjamin Franklin, 1780–85. Porcelain, 12 3/4 x 9 1/2 x 6 in. (32.4 x 24.1 x 15.2 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of William H. Huntington, 1883

Visitors to Versailles (1682–1789)

The palace of Versailles has attracted travelers since it was transformed under the direction of the Sun King, Louis XIV (1638–1715), from a simple hunting lodge into one of the most magnificent public courts of Europe. French and foreign travelers, royalty, dignitaries and ambassadors, artists, musicians, writers and philosophers, scientists, Grand Tourists and day-trippers alike, all flocked to the majestic royal palace surrounded by its extensive formal gardens. Opening April 16 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Visitors to Versailles (1682–1789) tracks these many travelers from 1682, when Louis XIV moved his court to Versailles, up to 1789, when Louis XVI (1754–1793) and the royal family were forced to leave the palace and return to Paris.

The exhibition brings together nearly 190 works from The Met, the Palace of Versailles, and more than 50 lenders worldwide. Through paintings, portraits, furniture, tapestries, carpets, costumes, porcelain, sculpture, weapons, guidebooks, and more, the exhibition illustrates what visitors encountered at court, what kind of welcome and access to the palace they received, and what impressions, gifts, and souvenirs they took home with them.

Exhibition Overview

Versailles was always truly international and surprisingly public. Countless visitors from around the world were welcomed at the palace. The openness reflected both a long French tradition of granting the king’s subjects access to their sovereign and a politically calculated display of the French State’s power and wealth. Many visitors described their experiences and observations in correspondence and journals. Court diaries, gazettes, and literary journals offer detailed reports on specific events and entertainments as well as on ambassadorial receptions that were also documented in paintings and engravings.

Informed by these surviving records, the exhibition unfolds in 12 thematically organized galleries to convey the unforgettable experience of visiting Versailles in the 17th and 18th centuries.

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